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Kansas City Chiefs Sign New Strength Staff

Posted Jan 14, 2013

Team looks to gain strength and endurance in offseason

Every team likes to get stronger in the offseason and the Chiefs staff signed just the guys to make that happen, announcing the hiring of coaches Barry Rubin (Head Strength & Conditioning) and Travis Crittenden (Assistant Strength & Conditioning) on Friday.

Barry Rubin’s experience in the strength and conditioning field speaks for itself. He joins the Chiefs after spending the 2010-12 seasons as the head strength and conditioning coach for the Philadelphia Eagles, where two years prior, he served the team as an assistant.

Rubin moved to The City of Brotherly Love from Green Bay, where he served the Packers for seven years as the head strength and conditioning coach (1999-2005) and four years as an assistant (1995-98).

The time in Green Bay was more than productive for Rubin, who during his tenure, the Packers earned six division titles, two NFC championship titles and one Super Bowl XXXI victory under then-head coach Mike Holmgren.

Rubin, who was inducted into the USA Strength and Conditioning Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003, would be the first to admit that behind every great head strength coach is a great assistant. The Chiefs agree and signed that great assistant, Travis Crittenden.

Crittenden joins the Chiefs as their new assistant strength and conditioning coach, following the 2012 season, where he excelled in the same role with the Philadelphia Eagles.

Before his time in the NFL, Crittenden served as the director of football operations and general manager of Competitive Edge Sports in Atlanta, GA for eight years (2004-11), where he led professional athletes through offseason training and also prepared collegiate football players for the NFL Combine and pro days.

The timing for both hires couldn’t be more perfect, especially with the offseason already here and players soon awaiting their new workout regimes.

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